Events

PoC Con Seoul 2016

Recently I had the pleasure to join the PowerOfCommunity conference in Seoul. Florian and Felix attended the conference in the past and enjoyed it a lot, so I took the opportunity to join this year. From what I had heard the conference is highly technical, offensive security and community focused (surprise 😉 ). Boy did they deliver!
Located in a hotel next to a nice park and close to the famous Gangnam district in Seoul we came together to feel the power of community. The conference was planned for two days and offered two tracks per day. Several key talks were presented for everyone. Continue reading “PoC Con Seoul 2016”

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Events

2nd Rounds of TROOPERS17 Talks!

It is the end of the year and we are hoping it is not too hectic of a time for you all! But if it is, hopefully the announcement of our next round of TROOPERS17 talks is enough to get you in the TROOPERS (if not the holiday) spirit 🙂


Francis Alexander & Bharadwaj Machiraju: How we hacked Distributed Configuration Management Systems

With increase in necessity of distributed applications, coordination and configuration management tools for these classes of applications have popped up. These systems might pop-up occasionally during penetration tests. The major focus of this research was to find ways to abuse these systems as well as use them for getting deeper access to other systems. Continue reading “2nd Rounds of TROOPERS17 Talks!”

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Events

TelcoSecDay 2017 – First Talks Published

Even if the CFP for TelcoSecDay 2017 is officially closed, I am still getting mails in. First of all: thank you for all your great feedback! As the TelcoSecDay is a complimentary and non-public event with highly specialized topics, it only works by sharing knowledge with each other. But please keep in mind that the speaker-slots are limited and I have to make a decision at some point of time.
Anyhow, I am looking forward for a great event and I am proud to publish the first accepted talks:
Continue reading “TelcoSecDay 2017 – First Talks Published”

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Breaking

A short Addendum on the Mirai Botnet Blog Post

While doing heap research on Linux processes (results are going to be published soon), I came across the bot from the Mirai Botnet. As already mentioned in the blog post by Brian, the Mirai bot uses obfuscated configuration data which contains e.g. the CnC server. When now confronted only with a bot (e.g. in the context of a running task or the ELF binary), but without the according source code, the decryption of this configuration data for e.g. incident analysis purposes might not be easily possible (with the python script from the blog post), if the key has been changed.
But in this case that is not a problem at all, because Continue reading “A short Addendum on the Mirai Botnet Blog Post”

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Misc

Research Diary: Bluetooth. Part 2

Recently we posted first part of our Bluetooth research diary. Today, we want to continue on that topic and tell you about Bluetooth proxying and packet replay with a new tool.

This time we had a new gadget to play with: our colleague Florian Grunow shared with us a curious IoT device – Bluetooth socks… real socks that you control with an app to heat your feet. The future is here… 😉 Continue reading “Research Diary: Bluetooth. Part 2”

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Breaking

Analyzing yet another Smart Home device

As you have probably already recognized, some of us here at ERNW are doing research in the area of smart home technologies e.g. KNX. Recently, we took a deeper look into a device which is used to control a smart home system produced by the vendor BAB TECHNOLOGIE GmbH called “eibPort”. This device can be used to control smart home systems based on different technologies e.g. EnoCean or KNX depending on the version of the device. Continue reading “Analyzing yet another Smart Home device”

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Breaking

Some Notes from the Lab – BlackNurse in the IPv6 Era

Since BlackNurse was released on 10th of November, we asked ourselves whether this problem does also apply to ICMPv6 traffic. To answer this question, Christian Tanck (one of our students) build a lab with several firewall appliances. Kudos to him for testing and the following blog post.

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Breaking

Research Diary: IP-Cameras Part 2

Hi everybody,
This is the second entry in our research diary on IP cameras. If you haven’t done so yet, you should read the first entry in advance. This time we focused more on analysis and exploitation.

Another entry vector

After running a vulnerability scan on both devices, it was revealed that the M1033 has multiple buffer overflow vulnerabilities (CVE-2012-5958 to CVE-2012-5965), which are readily exploitable via Metasploit. This gave us another shell (in addition to the root shell mentioned in the last post), though this time it was not a root shell. By using the find command, we searched for executables having the setuid or setgid bit set. We hoped to use one of those to escalate privileges. To do so yourself add the parameter -perm -4000 to find and it will search for files having the setuid bit set. If you try that on your own unix-like device, for example it should yield /bin/passwd which is perfectly reasonable as you’re able to change your password without being root.

Continue reading “Research Diary: IP-Cameras Part 2”

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Events

Defending Democracy

I recently had the pleasure to attend two events organized by the Digital Society Institute, one was a workshop on software vulnerabilities and one was their annual conference. For both events I delivered input on the security of security products and their evaluation (slides can be found here). The DSI did a great job of assembling people from various areas (e.g. industry, academia, politics, and research) so there was a lot of input which is not covered by conferences I usually attend. The workshop I attended also resulted in a short policy recommendation when it comes to the security of security products which can be found here.

 

Thanks & so long,

Matthias

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