Events

BlackHoodie 2016

This year’s BlackHoodie workshop rolled out with 28 amazing women from all parts of the world. It was a very vibrant group with students, professionals, engineers, researchers, physicists and what not. This is the second year that Marion Marschalek is running this reverse engineering workshop exclusively for women. There were a variety of topics that were covered. This includes anti emulation tricks, anti debuggers, packers, obfuscation, encryption/decryption functions, and a lot of fun with IDA.

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Reverse Engineering With Radare2 – Part 3

Sorry about the larger delay between the previous post and this one, but I was very busy the last weeks.
(And the technology I wanted to show wasn’t completely implemented in radare2, which means that I had to implement it on my own 😉 ). In case you’re new to this series, you’ll find the previous posts here.

As you may already know, we’ll deal with the third challenge today. The purpose for this one is to introduce
some constructs which are often used in real programs.

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Reverse Engineering With Radare2 – Part 2

Welcome back to the radare2 reversing tutorials. If you’ve missed the previous parts, you can find them here and here.

Last time we’ve used the rabin2 application to view the  strings found inside the challenge01 binary to find password candidates. Based on the results we looked into the assembly to find the correct password. In this post, we’ll go through the next challenge and try out some of the features provided by radare2.

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PFX Profiles in Microsoft’s System Management Server

In a recent assessment, we had to evaluate how Microsoft’s System Management Server (SMS) certificate management solution (CMS) stores and handles certificates. This question came up because sensitive, encrypted user certificates were to be stored in the SMS CMS. Due to the sensitivity of the handled certificates, we assessed the protection capabilities of the certificate management solution against extraction attempts from a local attacker with administrative privileges.

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Reverse Engineering With Radare2 – Intro

As some of you may know, there is a “new” reverse engineering toolkit out there which tries to compete with IDA Pro in terms of reverse engineering. I’m talking about radare2, a framework for reversing, patching, debugging and exploiting.

It has large scripting capabilities, runs on all major plattforms (Android, GNU/Linux, [Net|Free|Open]BSD, iOS, OSX, QNX, w32, w64, Solaris, Haiku, FirefoxOS and even on your pebble smartwatch 😉 ) and is free.

Sadly, I had some problems finding good tutorials on how to use it, as the interface is currently a bit cumbersome. After fiddling around, I’ve decided to create a little tutorial series where we can learn together ;). Continue reading “Reverse Engineering With Radare2 – Intro”

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Discover the Unknown: Analyzing an IoT Device

This blog post will give a brief overview about how a simple IoT device can be assessed. It will show a basic methodology, what tools can be used for different tasks and how to solve problems that may arise during analyses. It is aimed at readers that are interested in how such a device can be assessed, those with general interest in reverse engineering or the ones who just want to see how to technically approach an unknown device.

This post will most likely not cover any vulnerabilities per se. However, it outlines weaknesses which affect a wide range of IoT devices so various aspects are applicable to other devices and scenarios.

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Events

unrubby: reversing without reversing

The talk “unrubby: reversing without reversing” was part of the Troopers conference in Heidelberg, 16 March 2016. The talk was done by Richo Healey, who is currently working on the security engineering team at the Irish payment company Stripe. Richo Healey is an experienced conference speaker. Amongst other he has spoken at Kiwicon, DEF CON and 44con.
 
In his talk Richo Healey spoke about reverse engineering of Ruby software. First he talked about existing tools and techniques to regenerate source code from Ruby bytecode. Then he presented a new concept, which is implemented in his tool “unrubby”.

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Events

Reverse Engineering a Digital Two-Way Radio

In their talk “Reverse Engineering a Digital Two Way Radio” Travis Goodspeed and Christiane Ruetten presented the challenges they faced and overcame while reverse engineering “Tytera MD380”, a handheld transceiver for the Digital Mobile Radio (DMR) protocol.

“Tytera MD380” is based around two chips: STM32F405 CPU with an ARM Cortex M4F core and Readout Device Protection and a HRC5000 baseband processor which implements the actual digital radio. While STM32F405 is fully documented, there is no documentation for HRC5000 publicly available but with the help of the Chinese community they were able to obtain the Chinese documentation.

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Events

SDR and non-SDR tools for reverse engineering wireless systems

Hey there!
The God of frequencies Michael Ossmann visited us again this year at the TROOPERS16 and showed us how to break another device using a specific setup.

Last time he introduced the HackRF One to us (Read here:https://www.insinuator.net/2014/08/hackrf-one-the-story-continues/), but this post is a short summary of his talk about “Rapid Radio Reversing”, he is a wireless security researcher, who makes hardware for hackers. Best known for the HackRF, Ubertooth, and Daisho projects, he founded Great Scott Gadgets in an effort to put exciting, new tools into the hands of innovative people.

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