Breaking

Pidgin, Word Documents, my Clipboard and I

Lately, I’ve experienced some weird Pidgin crashes when I was copy&pasting into chat windows. The strange part was: I didn’t even know what triggered the crash because I actually didn’t know what was in my clipboard at this exact point. This is a quick write-up of how I investigated the issue and some interesting properties I found out about clipboards.

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Breaking

Reversing and Patching .NET Binaries with Embedded References

Lately I’ve been analyzing a .NET binary that was quite interesting. It was a portable binary that shipped without any third-party dependencies. I started looking at the .NET assembly with ILSpy and noticed that there was not that much code that ILSpy found and there were a lot of references to classes/methods that were neither in the classes identified by ILSpy nor were they part of the .NET framework.

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Events

11th USENIX Workshop on Offensive Technologies (WOOT17)

The 11th USENIX Workshop on Offensive Technologies (WOOT17) took place the last two days in Vancouver. Some colleagues and I had the chance to attend and enjoy the presentations of all accepted papers of this rather small, single-track co-located USENIX event. Unfortunately, the talks have not been recorded. However, all the papers should be available on the website. It’s worth taking a look at all of the papers, but these are some presentations that we’ve enjoyed: Continue reading “11th USENIX Workshop on Offensive Technologies (WOOT17)”

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Misc

6th No-Spy Conference

Last friday Florian and me attended the 6th No-Spy Conference in Stuttgart, Germany. We gave a talk about surveillance and censorship on modern devices in North Korea and discussed various aspects with the attendees. The atmosphere was very welcoming and we had some nice discussions about various topics which allowed us to better clarify some things. The slides are available here.

Thanks to the organizers for having us!

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Breaking

KNXmap: A KNXnet/IP Scanning and Auditing Tool

Users of the KNX, a standard for home automation bus systems, may already have come across KNXnet/IP (also known as EIBnet/IP): It is an extension for KNX that defines Ethernet as a communication medium for KNX which allows communication with KNX buses over IP driven networks. Additionally, it enables one to couple multiple bus installations over IP gateways, or so called KNXnet/IP gateways.

In the course of some KNX related research we’ve had access to various KNXnet/IP gateways from different vendors, most of them coupled in a lab setup for testing purposes. The typical tools used for such tasks are ETS, the professional software developed by the creators of KNX (proprietary, test licenses available) and eibd, an open source implementation of the KNX standard developed by the TU Vienna.

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Breaking

Implementing an Obsolete VPN Protocol on Top of HTTP: Because Why Not?

Recently I’ve started some research on MikroTik’s RouterOS, the operating system that ships with RouterBOARD devices. As I’m running such a device myself, one day I got curious about security vulnerabilities that have been reported on the operating system and the running services as it comes with tons of features. Searching for known vulnerabilities in RouterOS on Google doesn’t really yield a lot of recent security related stuff. So I thought, there is either a lack of (public) research or maybe it is super secure… 🙂

Not really satisfied with the outcome of my research about previous research one day I thought I give it a shot and just take a quick look at the management interfaces, mainly the web interface. As it turns out, there could be a third explanation for the lack of security related search results on Google: obfuscation. The communication of the web interface is obfuscated, most likely encrypted, which may discourages researchers that just came around to search for low hanging fruits. Continue reading “Implementing an Obsolete VPN Protocol on Top of HTTP: Because Why Not?”

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Breaking

Discover the Unknown: Analyzing an IoT Device

This blog post will give a brief overview about how a simple IoT device can be assessed. It will show a basic methodology, what tools can be used for different tasks and how to solve problems that may arise during analyses. It is aimed at readers that are interested in how such a device can be assessed, those with general interest in reverse engineering or the ones who just want to see how to technically approach an unknown device.

This post will most likely not cover any vulnerabilities per se. However, it outlines weaknesses which affect a wide range of IoT devices so various aspects are applicable to other devices and scenarios.

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