Breaking

ManiMed: Hamilton Medical AG – HAMILTON-T1 Ventilator Vulnerabilities

Manipulating Medical Devices

The Federal Office for Information Security (BSI) aims to sensitize manufacturers and the public regarding security risks of networked medical devices in Germany. In response to the often fatal security reports and press releases of networked medical devices, the BSI initiated the project Manipulation of Medical Devices (ManiMed) in 2019. In this project, a security analysis of selected products is carried out through security assessments followed by Coordinated Vulnerability Diclosure (CVD) processes. The project report was published on December 31, 2020, and can be accessed on the BSI website [1].

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Breaking

ManiMed: B. Braun Melsungen AG – Space System Vulnerabilities

Manipulating Medical Devices

The Federal Office for Information Security (BSI) aims to sensitize manufacturers and the public regarding security risks of networked medical devices in Germany. In response to the often fatal security reports and press releases of networked medical devices, the BSI initiated the project Manipulation of Medical Devices (ManiMed) in 2019. In this project, a security analysis of selected products is carried out through security assessments followed by Coordinated Vulnerability Diclosure (CVD) processes. The project report was published on December 31, 2020, and can be accessed on the BSI website [1].

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Breaking

ManiMed: Innokas Yhtymä Oy – VC150 Patient Monitor Vulnerabilities

Manipulating Medical Devices

The Federal Office for Information Security (BSI) aims to sensitize manufacturers and the public regarding security risks of networked medical devices in Germany. In response to the often fatal security reports and press releases of networked medical devices, the BSI initiated the project Manipulation of Medical Devices (ManiMed) in 2019. In this project, a security analysis of selected products is carried out through security assessments followed by Coordinated Vulnerability Diclosure (CVD) processes. The project report was published on December 31, 2020, and can be accessed on the BSI website [1].

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Breaking

ManiMed: Philips Medizin Systeme Böblingen GmbH – IntelliVue System Vulnerabilities

Manipulating Medical Devices

The Federal Office for Information Security (BSI) aims to sensitize manufacturers and the public regarding security risks of networked medical devices in Germany. In response to the often fatal security reports and press releases of networked medical devices, the BSI initiated the project Manipulation of Medical Devices (ManiMed) in 2019. In this project, a security analysis of selected products is carried out through security assessments followed by Coordinated Vulnerability Diclosure (CVD) processes. The project report was published on December 31, 2020, and can be accessed on the BSI website [1].

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Breaking

ManiMed: Market Analysis

Manipulating Medical Devices

The Federal Office for Information Security (BSI) aims to sensitize manufacturers and the public regarding security risks of networked medical devices in Germany. In response to the often fatal security reports and press releases of networked medical devices, the BSI initiated the project Manipulation of Medical Devices (ManiMed) in 2019. In this project, a security analysis of selected products is carried out through security assessments followed by Coordinated Vulnerability Diclosure (CVD) processes. The project report was published on December 31, 2020, and can be accessed on the BSI website [1].

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Building

ERNW White Paper 70 – HL7 FHIR: Preserving Distributed Resource Integrity

With this blog post I am pleased to announce the publication of a new ERNW White Paper about the HL7 FHIR communication standard.

Introduction

Digital networking is already widespread in many areas of life. More and more medical devices are also being networked in the healthcare industry. This growth makes the development and use of new medical communication standards necessary since existing solutions can only meet the changing requirements with great effort. The HL7 FHIR standard is an example of such a medical communication standard. FHIR is said to have increased the interoperability between different medical contexts,e.g., administration, billing, and clinical care, to enable data exchange of various systems. The FHIR standard addresses the security risks associated with strongly networked communication from a large number of systems across the trust and organizational boundaries only indirectly because FHIR does not define mandatory security controls or requirements.

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Misc

Apps on Prescription?! – Perspectives on Digital Health Applications (DiGA)

Some time ago, we carried out an evaluation of the Digital Health Applications Ordinance (Digitale-Gesundheitsanwendungen-Verordnung, DiGAV) for the Federal Chamber of Psychotherapists in Germany (Bundespsychotherapeutenkammer, BPtK) focusing on the security of digital health applications, often referred to as apps on prescription.

The audit was intended to determine to which extent security guidelines, security objectives, and best practices are adhered to by the requirements formulated by the ordinance, thus enabling the foundations to securely operate digital health applications. The main subject of the examination is whether requirements, including procedural requirements defined in the ordinance are sufficient to ensure security of digital health applications. The examination has shown that the requirements can be seen as positive. However, in order to be able to make reliable statements about the IT security of digital healthcare applications, further details and mechanisms should be clarified within the ordinance, which I would like to present in the following.

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Breaking

ERNW White Paper 69 – Safety Impact of Vulnerabilities in Insulin Pumps

With this blog post I am pleased to announce the publication of a new ERNW White Paper [1]. The paper is about severe vulnerabilities in an insulin pump we assessed during project ManiMed and we are proud to publish this subset of the results today.

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Building, Misc

How can data from fitness trackers be obtained and analyzed with a forensic approach?

The use of Internet of Things devices is continuously increasing: People buy devices, such as smart assistants, to make their lives more comfortable or fitness trackers to assess sports activities. According to the Pew Research Center [1], every fifth American wears a device to track their fitness. In Germany, the number increases likewise. The increasing number of fitness trackers in use can also be seen in criminal proceedings, as there exist more and more cases where these devices provide evidence.

Which useful evidential information fitness trackers collect and how to analyze them forensically was part of a paper that we presented at WACCO 2020 this year [2]. The goal was to develop an open source program to support investigators analyzing data that fitness trackers provide and to give a general approach on how to analyze fitness trackers.

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Breaking

Medical Device Security: HL7v2 Injections in Patient Monitors

Digital networking is already widespread in many areas of life. In the healthcare industry, a clear trend towards networked devices is noticeable, so that the number of high-tech medical devices in hospitals is steadily increasing.

In this blog post, we want to elucidate a vulnerability we identified during the security assessment of a patient monitor. The device sends HL7 v2.x messages, such as observation results to HL7 v2.x capable electronic medical record (EMR) systems. A user with malicious intent can tamper these messages. As HL7 v2.x is a common medical communication standard, we also want to present how this kind of vulnerability may be mitigated. The assessment was part of the BSI project ManiMed, which we would like to present in the following section.

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