Misc

XSS Vulnerability in Froala WYSIWYG HTML Editor

Recently, I had a brief look at the Froala WYSIWYG HTML Editor (v3.2.0) as there was a post about it on the Full Disclosure mailing list.

When targeting a HTML Editor, I guess one of the first things that everybody does is to check for XSS vulnerabilities. So I tried the usual XSS payloads (a great resource for XSS payloads is the XSS cheat sheet by PortSwigger) within the editor’s code view, but did not have much luck with the common payloads as they were filtered. However, using the HTML object tag, it was possible to trigger an XSS.

Continue reading “XSS Vulnerability in Froala WYSIWYG HTML Editor”

Continue reading
Misc

Microsoft Office Telemetry: Report Release

The German Federal Office for Information Security (orig., ger., Bundesamt für Sicherheit in der Informationstechnik – BSI) has published our report on Microsoft Office Telemetry.

Microsoft has released a set of privacy settings for Office, one of which enables users to configure the type and amount of diagnostic (i.e., telemetry) data that Office may send to Microsoft. When deployed, it is available in the form of a group policy setting. It allows users to configure one of the following diagnostic data levels: required, optional, or neither.  The report we produced:

  • analyzes the impact of the required, optional, and neither diagnostic data levels on the output of diagnostic data produced by Office; and
  • provides and evaluates approaches for partially or fully disabling the output of diagnostic data produced by Office.

The report is available here (in English).

Continue reading “Microsoft Office Telemetry: Report Release”

Continue reading
Misc

Forklift <=3.3.9 and <=3.4 Local Privilege Escalations on macOS (CVE-2020-15349/CVE-2020-27192)

I have started to have a look at my local installed helpers on macOS. These helpers are used as an interface for applications to perform privileged operations on the system. Thus, it is quite a nice attack surface to search for Local Privilege Escalations.

Forklift is an advanced dual pane file manager for macOS. It is well known under macOS power users.

As part of my investigation I identified vulnerabilities in Forklift allowing local privilege escalation.

By now all vulnerabilities are fixed by the vendor I can release the details: https://binarynights.com/versionhistory

Continue reading “Forklift <=3.3.9 and <=3.4 Local Privilege Escalations on macOS (CVE-2020-15349/CVE-2020-27192)”

Continue reading
Building

Reversing C++ Without Getting a Heart Attack – DEvirtualize VIrtual Calls With Devi

TLDR: This blogpost presents devi, a tool that can help you devirtualize virtual calls in C++ binaries. It uses Frida to trace the execution of a binary and uncover the call sources and destinations of virtual calls. The collected information can then be viewed in IDA Pro, Binary Ninja, or Ghidra. The plugin adds the respective control-flow edges allowing further analysis (using different plugins) or simply providing more comfort when analyzing C++ binaries.

Continue reading “Reversing C++ Without Getting a Heart Attack – DEvirtualize VIrtual Calls With Devi”

Continue reading
Misc

Apps on Prescription?! – Perspectives on Digital Health Applications (DiGA)

Some time ago, we carried out an evaluation of the Digital Health Applications Ordinance (Digitale-Gesundheitsanwendungen-Verordnung, DiGAV) for the Federal Chamber of Psychotherapists in Germany (Bundespsychotherapeutenkammer, BPtK) focusing on the security of digital health applications, often referred to as apps on prescription.

The audit was intended to determine to which extent security guidelines, security objectives, and best practices are adhered to by the requirements formulated by the ordinance, thus enabling the foundations to securely operate digital health applications. The main subject of the examination is whether requirements, including procedural requirements defined in the ordinance are sufficient to ensure security of digital health applications. The examination has shown that the requirements can be seen as positive. However, in order to be able to make reliable statements about the IT security of digital healthcare applications, further details and mechanisms should be clarified within the ordinance, which I would like to present in the following.

Continue reading “Apps on Prescription?! – Perspectives on Digital Health Applications (DiGA)”

Continue reading
Misc

OpenSIS Vulnerabilities

OpenSIS is an open source student information system. Recently, it was affected by several vulnerabilities such as SQL injections, local file inclusions and incorrect access controls (CVE-2020-13380, CVE-2020-13381, CVE-2020-13382, CVE-2020-13383). That is why I got interested and also had a quick look at the application.

As part of this investigation, I discovered two vulnerabilities, an XSS vulnerability (CVE-2020-27409) in the file SideForStudent.php that got quickly fixed after being reported (see commit edca085 for the details; the commit is included in release v7.5) and some incorrect (i.e. non-existent) access controls for the password change functionality (CVE-2020-27408). In this blog post, I would like to focus on the second vulnerability and describe the tedious disclosure process that – in the end – lead to nothing but the implementation of some ineffective obfuscation mechanism.
Continue reading “OpenSIS Vulnerabilities”

Continue reading
Breaking

ERNW White Paper 69 – Safety Impact of Vulnerabilities in Insulin Pumps

With this blog post I am pleased to announce the publication of a new ERNW White Paper [1]. The paper is about severe vulnerabilities in an insulin pump we assessed during project ManiMed and we are proud to publish this subset of the results today.

Continue reading “ERNW White Paper 69 – Safety Impact of Vulnerabilities in Insulin Pumps”

Continue reading
Building, Misc

How can data from fitness trackers be obtained and analyzed with a forensic approach?

The use of Internet of Things devices is continuously increasing: People buy devices, such as smart assistants, to make their lives more comfortable or fitness trackers to assess sports activities. According to the Pew Research Center [1], every fifth American wears a device to track their fitness. In Germany, the number increases likewise. The increasing number of fitness trackers in use can also be seen in criminal proceedings, as there exist more and more cases where these devices provide evidence.

Which useful evidential information fitness trackers collect and how to analyze them forensically was part of a paper that we presented at WACCO 2020 this year [2]. The goal was to develop an open source program to support investigators analyzing data that fitness trackers provide and to give a general approach on how to analyze fitness trackers.

Continue reading “How can data from fitness trackers be obtained and analyzed with a forensic approach?”

Continue reading